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St. John the Evangelist

280 St. James Street
London, ON  N6A 1X3
Phone: 519-432-3743
Email: office@stjohnslondon.ca

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The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by St. John the Evangelist Anglican Church and while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Read More…

Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of this website. Through this website you are able to link to other websites which are not under the control of St. John's. We have no control over the nature, content and availability of those sites. The inclusion of any links does not necessarily imply a recommendation or endorse the views expressed within them. Every effort is made to keep the website up and running smoothly. However, St. John's takes no responsibility for, and will not be liable for, the website being temporarily unavailable due to technical issues beyond our control. This website and its content is the copyright of St. John the Evangelist - © 2020. All rights reserved; any redistribution or reproduction of part or all of the contents in any form is prohibited without express written permission.

  • POLLINATION GARDEN

    SUCCESSFUL POLLINATION


    St. John the Evangelist is putting its church gardens to the service of the environment by transforming its flower beds into gardens for the bees and other pollinators. Plants of particular pollinator value are identified in the garden with a number and name. This tour can help the visitor find plants that could be added to a home garden.

    Bees need our help ...

    PLANT BEE FOOD


    Bees eat two things: nectar (loaded with sugar and a bee’s main source of energy) and pollen (which provides proteins and fats). Choose a variety of plants that flower at different times so there’s always a snack available. As a rule, native plants attract native bees and exotic plants attract honeybees. Flowers bred to please the human eye (for things like size and complexity) are sometimes sterile and of little use to pollinators. Native plants or heirloom varieties are best! Bees have good colour vision. They especially like blue, purple, violet, white and yellow. Create floral bull’s eyes: Plant flowers of a single species in clumps about four feet in diameter instead of in scatterings so bees are more likely to find them.

    Wild Bee Sanctuary

    Wild bees need our help. Many populations are declining due to habitat loss, disease and pesticide poisoning. Domesticated honeybees managed for honey production and agricultural services are also struggling.

    As our most important pollinators, bees provide one-third of the food we eat. They also allow wild plants to reproduce and produce berries, fruits and seeds. Bee losses pose a risk to our life support systems.

    There are 20,000 known bee species worldwide and more than 800 native bee species in Canada of all sizes — the smallest is the size of the head of a pin! Each is unique and pollinates different plants at different times. For example, squash bees are the best for squash, pumpkins and gourds. Every species is beneficial to plants.

    Each of us can create habitat to support local bee populations. Bees are more likely to thrive in your backyard, community or patio garden and on mixed farms than on acres devoted to single crops. Urban settings mean short flight paths and a variety of different plants and flowers to sample.

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    The bee friend, a painting by Hans Thoma (1839–1924) Hans Thoma was one of Germany's outstanding painters in the late century. From the earliest times Ireland was known for its plenitude of honey. The ancient Celts considered beekeeping so important to the livelihood of the people and the fertility of the land. Whenever there was a death in the family, someone had to go out to the hives and tell the bees

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    About Our Garden

    TRANSFORMING


    St. John the Evangelist is putting its church gardens to the service of the environment by transforming its flower beds into gardens for the bees and other pollinators. Plants of particular pollinator value are identified in the garden with a number and name. This tour can help the visitor find plants that could be added to a home garden.


    Home Garden

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    The Project

    EDUCATION


    Ten pollination gardens in Southwestern Ontario are planted in 2014 with flowers that feed the bees. Three of these will receive an award of excellence based on design, education and community development at Bee Fest, October 4, Feast of St. Francis, at Banting House in London.


    Community

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    Our Church

    HOPITIALITY


    For 126 years St. John the Evangelist Church has been a community that worships God and serves the community. There is a vibrant music programme and up to 150 people in need are served a hospitality meal each Saturday evening.


    Vibrant Music

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    Bee Plants

    ESPECIALLY USEFUL


    These plants have been observed to be especially useful for bees, are suitable at our particular location with its characteristics of sun and moisture, and are readily available.


    Sun and Moisture

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    Our Partners

    SHEPHERDING


    Thank you to our generous sponsors: Lee Valley Tools, Floral Express. Partners include Nature Conservancy of Canada, Pollination Canada, WWF Canada. Participants are churches in the Anglican Church, Diocese of Huron. In Cambridge: St. James; Windsor: All Saints; Clinton: St. Paul’s; Seaforth: St. Thomas; London: St. Aidan’s, St. Andrew Memorial, St. John the Evangelist, Transfiguration; Huron Church Camp. The project unfolded in coordination with the Diocese of Huron’s EnviroAction Committee, whose members are shepherding the Church to increased environmental awareness and action. Funding is provided by the Julia Hunter Fund an endowed fund at the London Community Foundation that supports public gardens based on the criteria of design, education and community development.


    Julie Hunter Fund

    POLLINATION GARDEN - A SELF-GUIDED TOUR

    The pollinator plants are grouped into seven zones, starting with the west facing Wellington Street side of the building, and continuing around to the rental property each of the church.

    • ZONE A. Wellington (west) side.

      • Campanula carpatica Bellflower ‘Blue Clips’, ‘White Clips’
      • Echinacea purpurea Purple Coneflower
      • Lathyrus latifolius Perennial Sweet Pea
      • Lavendula spp. Lavender
      • Lysimachia punctata Yellow Loosestrife
      • Rudbekia hirta Brown-eyed Susan
      • Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’

    • ZONE B. Around the electronic sign plus the small bed to the west of the doors and immediately north of the sign.

      • Coreopsis lanceolata Tickseed
      • Echinacea purpurea Purple Coneflower
      • Geranium spp Cranesbill
      • Phlox paniculata Phlox
      • Spirea japonica Spirea ‘Magic Carpet’
      • Scilla siberica Scilla (plant visible spring only)

    • ZONE C. Starting at the church door at the west end of the St. James Street side and going east as far as the watering tap.

      • Achillea Yarrow ‘Moonshine’
      • Asclepias incarnata Swamp milkweed
      • Asclepias tuberosa Butterfly weed
      • Eupatorium rugosum Snakeroot ‘Chocolate’
      • Lamnium album Deadnettle
      • Oenothera fruticosa Evening Primrose
      • Solidago spp Goldenrod
      • Syringia x prestoniae Preston Lilac
      • Verbena ‘Lanai’ and ‘Royal Whitecap’ Annual verbena ‘Lanai’ and ‘Royal Whitecap’

    • ZONE D. East of the watering tap past the tower door to the driveway.

      • Cornus mas Cornelian Cherry (shrub/tree)
      • Eupatorium purpureum Joe Pye Weed
      • Liatris spicata Gayfeather/Blazing Star
      • Phlox subulata Moss phlox
      • Rudbekia hirta Brown-eyed Susan
      • Spirea japonica ‘Goldflame’ Spirea ‘Goldflame’

    • ZONE E. Sedum bed around maple tree.

      • Sedum reflexum ‘Blue Spruce’ Sedum ‘Blue Spruce’

    • ZONE F. Bed along driveway to the church office entrance.

      • America pseudarmeria ‘Ballerina Lilac’ False Sea Thrift ‘Ballerina Lilac’
      • Arabis alpina Arabis
      • Leucanthemum x superbum Shasta Daisy
      • Rudbekia hirta Brown-eyed Susan
      • Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’

    • ZONE G. Bed in front of window of 284.

      • Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’
      • Sedum ‘Angelina’ Sedum ‘Angelina’

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    St. John’s Heavenly Honey

    Honey For Sale (Heavenly Honey) is a new project started by Pety Noble which officially rolled out on Rogation Sunday, May 26th, 2019. The honey is Natural, Unfiltered and full of healthy important enzymes provided by flowers and collected by bees at Owl Farms in Prince Edward County.

    Always available at the church office: 519-432-3743

    ALL proceeds support St. John’s beautiful pollinating Gardens.

    • On that day the Creator will whistle for the bees.
      Isaiah 7:18 paraphrased

    At St. John’s we strongly believe in serving and supporting the community. As a result, in addition to weekly worship, a major part of our Christian ministry includes volunteerism and outreach activities. In the past we have supported causes in London and around the world touching on issues including poverty, social justice, children’s issues and community health.

    © 2020 stjohnslondon.ca

    At St. John’s we strongly believe in serving and supporting the community. As a result, in addition to weekly worship, a major part of our Christian ministry includes volunteerism and outreach activities. In the past we have supported causes in London and around the world touching on issues including poverty, social justice, children’s issues and community health.

    © 2020 stjohnslondon.ca

    Pollination Garden | ST JOHN'S